End-of-Life Choice, Palliative Care and Counseling

Posts TaggedERD

End-of-Life Care Reassurance as ACH Considers Its Dignity Deal

Ashland Daily Tidings
September 13, 2012

 

Ashland Community Hospital officials insist the end-of-life care its patients receive will not change if a partnership is formed with Dignity Health.

Physicians at ACH can prescribe patients who qualify under the Oregon Death with Dignity Act medication that induces death upon ingesting, said Mark Marchetti, ACH chief executive officer. “We have no policies that dictate the issue one way or another,” Marchetti said. “We certainly don’t monitor our physicians’ prescribing.”

The hospital’s physicians can discuss the option of self-administered death with patients, he said.

Many of ACH’s physicians have made the personal and legal choice to not prescribe aid-in-dying medications, Marchetti said, “because that’s their personal philosophical position.”

Patients who are part of ACH’s Hospice Program, which cares for those diagnosed with illnesses that likely will kill them within six months, can discuss the option of self-administered death with hospice nurses and social workers as well, he said.

The Hospice Program’s nurses and social workers “refer them to their own physician and continue to provide the hospice services … and we’re even willing to be there while they take the drug,” Marchetti said. “We don’t participate.”

The Oregon Death with Dignity Act requires a patient who opts for aid in dying to administer the life-ending drug independently.

Jason Renaud, a representative from Compassion & Choices of Oregon, said he is concerned ACH’s policy will change if a partnership is formed. More

Bishop cuts ties to hospital over birth control

By JEFF BARNARD Associated Press Writer
Feb 16, 2010
GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) — The Catholic Church is ending its long-standing relationship with St. Charles Medical Center in Bend over a surgical birth-control technique.

Diocese of Baker Bishop Robert Vasa said Tuesday the church can no longer sponsor the hospital because it continues to offer tubal ligation, which leaves women unable to get pregnant and is specifically prohibited by church teachings. “Pregnancy itself is not a disease, even though in our culture we treat pregnancy as a disease,” Vasa said. “So this prevents the function of a properly functioning organ under the guise of health care.

“It would be misleading for me to allow St. Charles Bend to be acknowledged as Catholic in name while I am certain that some important tenets of the Ethical and Religious Directives are no longer being observed.” Catholic Mass will no longer be celebrated in the hospital chapel, and church property not needed by the hospital will be returned, Vasa said.

The name of the hospital remains St. Charles, and the decision does not apply to affiliated facilities in Redmond and Prineville, which never were tied to the church, Vasa added. The hospital does about 235 tubal ligations a year, and Vasa and the hospital had been in negotiations over the issue for a few years. They finally decided that neither could bend from their positions.

“We just felt we have been offering these procedures for decades and we have an obligation to the patients in our community to offer the procedures they need,” said James Diegel, president and CEO of Cascade Healthcare Community President, the hospital’s parent company. “This should have no impact on our operations or finances or anything. It’s just a severing of an historical relationship that has been in place for 90-plus years.

“The hospital was founded in 1918 by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Tipton, Ind., and the order’s last administrator retired in 1988, serving on the board until 2000. The hospital was taken over by a local nonprofit organization in the 1970s. The hospital would continue to look to church directives for guidance, Diegel added.

“This doesn’t change who we have been, who we are and who we will continue to be going forward,” Diegel said.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE HERE >>

Pope vs. Doctors: How New Vatican Orthodoxy Undermines Medical Ethics and Imperils Your Health

 Jacob M. Appel, Bioethicist and medical historian

The Huffington Post

Posted: February 10, 2010 05:31 PM

Catholic hospitals, which boast a long and admirable history of caring for the seriously ill and indigent in the United States, have for many years finessed the challenges of serving two disparate and often incompatible masters. On the one hand, the nation’s 573 Church-run hospitals and their physicians are not permitted by Vatican policy to offer services or advice to patients when doing so violates Catholic teaching. In theory, prohibited activities range from providing abortions and assisting suicides to urging patients with HIV to wear condoms when engaged in unprotected sex or telling bipolar women on lithium to use contraceptives to prevent birth defects. On the other hand, these hospitals–which serve about one third of all patients in the nation–are also quasi-public institutions, and their physicians and nurses are bound by the same ethical obligations that govern all other members of their professions. They must obtained informed consent, honor patient autonomy, and offer medical care in line with the clinical standards of their colleagues at secular institutions. While a latent tension often exists between these competing allegiances, two recent developments relating to Church policy have set medical ethics and Catholic doctrine on an unfortunate collision course.

The first of these disturbing Church salvos against mainstream medical ethics is to be found in the newly promulgated Directive 58 of the United States bishops’ body governing Catholic health care services. This edict states that, barring certain specific circumstances, such as imminent death, Church doctrine prevents competent patients from refusing artificial nutrition and hydration. William Grogan, a religious advisor to Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, explained to the media that death would have to be expected within two weeks for a patient to turn down a feeding tube. In other words, according to current Catholic teaching, a cancer patient in a coma with a life expectancy of four weeks must now be force-fed–no matter what his prior instructions stated and without regard to his family’s wishes. All comatose and vegetative patients will be required to accept nutrition and hydration indefinitely, even if they leave behind air-tight living wills objecting to such “heroic” and invasive measures. This extreme policy apparently applies to all patients receiving care in Catholic-run hospitals, whether or not they are Catholic. Since United States courts have consistently accepted that mentally-competent patients have a right to refuse care if their wishes are clear and documented, these rules may well be illegal. However, even if Directive 58 is not a violation of the law, it is a gross breach of accepted standards of medical ethics. No doctor or nurse in the United States may provide such unwanted nutrition and hydration without defying a well-established code of professional conduct. It is likely that any provider who acted in this paternalistic and unequivocally immoral manner would lose his or her license. In the very least, the provider would become a pariah among his colleagues.

A second Church-instigated challenge to medical ethics has arisen as a result of a grass roots protest by anti-abortion organizations in Pennsylvania against the well-regarded St. Mary’s Medical Center of Langhorne. In this case, Dr. Stephen Smith of St. Mary’s performed an ultrasound on an expecting mother and confirmed that the fetus had polycystic kidney disease, a fatal condition in infants. Smith recommended an abortion. When the pregnant women sought a second opinion, a midwife at Mother Bachman Maternity Center in nearby Bensalem, operated by the St. Mary’s, also recommended termination. The mother refused, which was certainly her prerogative, and the infant died two hours after birth. When local abortion opponents publicized Smith’s advice, a private citizen named Joseph Trevington demanded a formal review of St. Mary’s by the local archdiocese. The results of this ethics investigation are not yet publicly known, and may never be revealed, although a diocese spokesman stated that changes in the hospital policies are to be expected.

The very decision to conduct such a moral audit displays a chilling new direction in Church practice. As a matter of doctrine, Catholic hospitals require employees to “respect and uphold the religious mission” of their institutions as “a condition for medical privileges and employment.” So, in theory, any physician endorsing abortion (or vasectomies, birth control, withdrawal of life support, etc.) while on the hospital premises should be relieved of his duties. As a matter of Catholic doctrine, Trevington and his anti-abortion brethren appear to have the better half of the theological argument, at least when it comes to consistency and the letter of the law. At the same time, allowing Church dogma to dictate the medical practices of physicians clearly violates the most basic tenets of healthcare ethics. Dr. Smith had a duty to offer advice to his patient based upon his best independent professional judgment–which he apparently did. The Hobson’s choice that he faced–either to follow the Catholic “law” enshrined as policy or to adhere to medical obligation–was unreasonable and unacceptable.

Both of these events expose the dark and unspoken (although widely understood) secret that enables Catholic hospitals to practice first-class medicine: Official Church policy on matters such as contraception and end-of-life care, like much Catholic doctrine more generally, is largely honored only in the breach. I have known many excellent physicians over the years, both religious and secular, who work at Church-run hospitals. All of them advise women taking medications that cause birth defects to use contraception and tell HIV-infected patients to use condoms. Many offer direct counseling on abortion, certainly when fetal prognosis is grim. I cannot imagine any of these gifted doctors would force-feed an unwilling cancer patient in violation of an advance directive or a health care proxy’s wishes. Much like the absurd loyalty oath that New York’s college professors–myself included–take to uphold the state’s constitution, any pledge to support Catholic doctrine on medical matters is broadly viewed as a formality to be agreed to and then summarily ignored. Historically, the Church has looked the other way. Now, by challenging this longstanding system of benign neglect, bishops and grass roots zealots may believe they will achieve ideological purity. What they are actually doing is jeopardizing both the welfare of Catholic hospitals and the public health.

Some concrete thinkers may argue that since Catholic hospitals are “private” institutions, the Vatican can impose any rules that it wants. The claim belies the inherently public nature of the American hospital system. Catholic hospitals–like virtually all other hospitals in the Unites States–are only able to function as a result of a swath of government handouts and subsidies. Medicare and Medicaid pay the bills of almost half their patients. Federal funding supports the salaries of their medical residents. NIH Grants sponsor their research and clinical care. Many of the hospital buildings themselves were erected will federal construction dollars providing by the Hill-Burton Act of 1946. Private businesses may have a claim to considerable leeway in formulating their own rules and policies–although even “mom & pop” stores are reasonably prevented from excluding African-American customers and are often required to accommodate disabled shoppers. In theological matters, the Pope is certainly free to issue any decree he likes and those who wish to follow his dictates are entitled to do so. In contrast, Catholic hospitals function as public entities that serve people of all faiths and traditions. A patient in a medical emergency is taken by ambulance to the nearest hospital, not the nearest hospital that shares his social values. A system that operated otherwise would lead to logistical chaos and increased mortality. Once one accepts the premise that Catholic hospitals are public institutions, they have a moral obligation to comply with generally accepted standards of patient care and professional ethics. Today’s hospitals are far more Caesar’s than they are God’s.

One of the greatest triumphs of modern health care in the United States is the rise of nonsectarian service. In an earlier era in New York City, for example, Jews sought care at Mount Sinai while Protestants preferred Presbyterian Hospital and Catholics chose St. Vincent’s. Now, most patients–and all wise ones–choose their health care providers for clinical skills and personal attributes, not religious labels. As a result, the majority of patients at Catholic hospitals are not Catholic. To impose orthodox Catholic doctrine on these non-Catholic individuals at the most vulnerable moments of their lives would be the most significant Church intervention in the lives of non-adherents since the Inquisition. Doing so would also threaten the ability of physicians to practice at Catholic hospitals without violating their professional codes of ethics. In light of these developments, any patient currently receiving care in a Catholic-run hospital should immediately clarify with her doctor whether this physician will follow the patient’s own end-of-life wishes regarding so-called heroic measures if they come into conflict with Directive 58.

The Catholic Church has every right to announce and publicize its views on certain medical interventions and to declare that Catholics who engage in certain conduct are violating the rules of the Church. It’s the Pope’s club. He can make the by-laws. He does not have any business imposing such rules on third parties who do not wish to follow them. It will be a sorry day if American patients seeking the best medical care are forced to avoid Catholic hospitals for fear of having their living wills ignored or their doctors’ counsel dictated from Rome. The Church would be wise to focus its energies on theology and to leave the practice of medicine to the professionals.

Read this post at its original site at The Huffington Post.

How the opinion of one pope became the rule for all Americans

The US Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), as I have written, recently mandated tube-feeding for all permanently unconscious patients in Catholic healthcare institutions. This contradicts the desires of the vast majority of Americans. The Bishops are indifferent and have decided to act as agents of the Vatican, even as they exercise enormous control over healthcare choices in America. How did they arrive at this position of arrogance?

The story of how one pope’s opinion came to control Catholic healthcare throughout America is both fascinating and scary. It is the story of debate squashed, and profound authoritarianism prevailing.  The story ends with absolute obedience to the dictates of Rome by Catholic medical providers who vow to impose the pope’s dictates on Catholic and non-Catholic patients alike, even though they personally disagree with the edict.

For decades after feeding tubes became commonplace, the ethics of Catholic healthcare institutions maintained a generous and merciful position toward their use. Their position rested on a principle that one must employ ordinary means to prolong life but may forego extraordinary means in the same circumstance.

Professor of religion and social ethics Thomas Shannon wrote

. . . the common Catholic tradition has sought to determine what benefits an intervention would provide and whether the burdens of intervention are proportionate or disproportionate to the expected benefits.

In this view, the use of a feeding tube is evaluated considering a patient’s individual views on the quality of life, burdensome medical treatment and what constitutes a faithful and devout relationship with God. Many Catholics were comfortable with the common tradition, and many Catholic ethicists comfortable allowing families to give weight to their loved one’s aversion to living in a state of suspended animation for years or decades.

Extreme pro-life Catholics, however, argued that food and water, even artificially administered, are ordinary and basic, and sustaining life itself of any quality is fundamentally beneficial. Pope John Paul II fostered the ascendancy of the pro-life movement within the Church.

Prompted  by The Terri Schiavo case, the Pope sided with the picketers outside Ms. Schiavo’s hospice room, declaring that tube-feeding patients in a permanent vegetative state “always represents a natural means of preserving life, not a medical act” and should “be considered, in principle, ordinary and proportionate.”

Did the pope’s guidelines allow for the patient’s view of benefits and burdens? Some ethicists still thought yes, but a September, 2007 response from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF, formerly called the Office of the Inquisition), said:

No. A patient in a ‘permanent vegetative state’ is a person with fundamental human dignity and must, therefore, receive ordinary and proportionate care which includes, in principle, the administration of water and food even by artificial means.

Even then some Catholic bioethicists like John Hardt looked for personal choice in the CDF’s use of the phrase, “in principle.” But in November, the Bishops closed the door: feeding tubes are obligatory.

Why did the bishops make a nationwide rule at odds with the beliefs of many devout Catholics, with a tradition of weighing benefits and burdens on an individual basis, and with established medical practice at most Catholic institutions? My own opinion is the Vatican and the Bishops turned to serious enforcement to impose their dogma precisely because Catholic patients and practitioners were not following their extreme pro-life doctrine in private medical decisions.

My friend Dan Maguire, Professor of Moral Theology at Marquette University, has said,

In Catholicism there are three sources of truth, (or three “magisteria”): the hierarchy, the theologians, and the wisdom and experience of the laity (called in Latin sensus fidelium).

Like a three-legged stool, multiple sources of wisdom have maintained the stability of Catholic wisdom. In the feeding tube decision, I believe the honest observer would see a one-legged stool making all the decisions, and a clear victory for the hardliners.

The moderates have lost the debate, and so have we. The Vatican has cut off the two offending legs of the stool and nullified ethical consideration of individual weighing of burdens and benefits. Cardinal Rigali, chair of the Committee on Pro-Life Activities and Bishop Lori, chair of the USCCB Committee on Doctrine, in stern tones, announced as much:

Even if one judges that such a condition, when prolonged, makes survival itself a burden, such a judgment does not justify removing food and water …

Codification of the Vatican’s ruling in the Ethical and Religious Directives ties the hands of Catholic patients and families, faithful physicians, nurses and caregivers and impacts everyone under care in a Catholic healthcare institution. We must increase public awareness of the threats to their rights in Catholic institutions and take steps to stop the Vatican from unilaterally ignoring legally executed advance directives. There can be no further dissent from within the Church. Daniel Sulmasy, a Franciscan Brother, internist and ethicist at St. Vincent’s hospital in New York, sympathizes with people of deep faith who do not wish to offend God, but nevertheless are horrified at the prospect of years, or even decades, lingering in a state of mere existence, without the ability to think, feel, pray, or relate to loved ones.  Fr. Sulmasy said the restrictive rule would be difficult to follow, though as “an obedient friar and physician” he would do so.

Consumers of Catholic healthcare, don’t say you weren’t warned.

Media Shine Light on New Mandate from Bishops

We have been spreading the word since the US Council of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) adopted new rules in November, obligating feeding tubes for permanently unconscious patients in Catholic healthcare facilities. David Dayen at firedoglake and Ann Neumann at otherspoon have reported the story. Now traditional media sources are picking up the story.

On December 20th, Charles Stanley of Atlanta’s Sunday Paper reported on the new directive, its potential conflict with patients’ stated wishes, and the potential legal conflicts.

In yesterday’s San Francisco Chronicle, Bob Egelko reports on the new mandate’s impact on Bay Area Catholic care facilities and the families who could face unexpected challenges in making decisions about care for a loved one.

The directive plunges the bishops into another health care controversy, on the heels of their lobbying for tight restrictions on abortion coverage in health legislation pending in Congress.

Catholic hospital officials say the November decree isn’t rigid and leaves room for accommodating patients’ wishes. But the bishops’ language appears to conflict with a hospital’s legal duty to follow a patient’s instructions to withdraw life support, as expressed in an advance written directive or by a close relative or friend who knows the patient’s intentions.

Courts have ordered hospitals to disconnect feeding tubes when an unconscious patient’s wishes were clearly established. The best-known case involved Terri Schiavo, the Florida woman who died in 2005 after 15 years in a coma and unsuccessful attempts by her parents and Republicans in Congress to keep her alive.

The bishops’ order “fails to respect settled law that empowers patients with the right to refuse or direct the withdrawal of life-prolonging care,” said Barbara Coombs Lee, president of Compassion & Choices, which advocates for the right of terminally ill patients to make life-or-death decisions.

“It will apply irrespective of your religious faith, your stated wishes in an advance directive, or the instructions of your family.”

That’s not how the bishops’ decree will be carried out, Catholic hospital organizations insist.

The decree itself does not require life-sustaining care that would be “excessively burdensome for the patient” or would cause “significant physical discomfort.” If those exemptions don’t apply, a hospital will send a patient elsewhere rather than violate his or her expressed wishes, the organizations said.

“If it was unresolvable … we would transfer them or find some other means to accommodate them,” said Lori Dangberg, spokeswoman for the Alliance of Catholic Health Care, which represents California’s 55 Catholic hospitals.

There you go. “the November decree isn’t rigid and leaves room for accommodating patients’ wishes.” Because you can do what the Bishops tell you to do, or go somewhere else.

You can read the full San Francisco Chronicle article here.