End-of-Life Choice, Palliative Care and Counseling

Posts Taggedreimbursement

Who Failed the American People?

The federal government once again has decided not to help seniors with advance care planning. On Wednesday, the Obama administration announced it is dropping a Medicare provision reimbursing doctors for talking with their patients about end-of-life planning. People have been calling for the reimbursement policy for years – not only advocates of better care and choice at the end of life, like Compassion & Choices – but hospice workers, geriatricians, palliative care experts, public health in end-of-life planning and politicians of both major parties.

Every respected authority recognizes incentives for doctors to learn their patients’ preferences make it more likely patients will get the care they want. Most important, seniors who are ready to plan seriously for how they hope to spend their final days want this provision. Family members who might otherwise find themselves making unguided decisions for loved ones unable to speak for themselves would also benefit

Why then did the administration drop the provision, just days after it took effect? The explanation was that the process of publishing the regulation was not by the book, but certainly politics played a part. This common-sense measure has been the center of controversy for over a year and a half. The whole spectacle highlights how our political process can fail miserably to promote the public good.

Experts, advocates, seniors and families are understandably disappointed. We may all wonder where to direct our frustration and place responsibility. Should we blame opponents of health insurance reform, who cynically distorted the facts about advance planning conversations to stoke fear? Is the media responsible, for endlessly repeating the sensational claims about “death panels” – even now – long after they are proven false? Should we deplore that politicians’ own efforts to avoid the subject of death and deter conversations about the provision, ironically ignited more controversy and accusations of stealthy tactics? What are we to do when our leaders in government appear to back down to bullies?

I believe it is better to direct our energy toward solutions: solutions that we, individually and collectively, can bring about outside the political process. A change in Medicare policy is still a worthy goal, but we cannot patiently wait for our broken politics to mend. The result would be too many dying in circumstances of unnecessary torture; too many families struggling to make decisions in crisis.

Medicare beneficiaries can still have a conversation with their doctors about advance care planning. In fact every American – or at least those who anticipate that some day they may die – should have this conversation. The point of an advance directive, after all, is to prepare for difficult circumstances that could precede our deaths.

If you become unable to make or communicate health care decisions, having talked with your doctor and your loved ones, appointed a representative and prepared a written record of your wishes will be invaluable. If the process seems daunting, visit our Good to Go page. You can find help and ideas in our Good to Go Resource Guide and get everything you need free in our Good to Go Toolkit.

When the political fails, the personal can still succeed. You can make it happen. Initiate the conversation. Protect your family from a potential struggle over decisions about life-sustaining treatment.

For more information about end-of-life planning, visit Compassion & Choices’ Good to Go page.