The American public consistently supports medical aid in dying by large majorities in both independent national and state surveys. Polling outlets such as Gallup and Harris both report strong support for medical aid in dying. Similarly, state-by-state polling also indicates majority support across demographic groups.

National Polling

Gynecologic Oncology survey Aug 2021

  • The majority of respondents (69%) believed MAID [medical aid in dying] should be legal.”
  • Respondents reporting MAID was either illegal or of unknown legal status in their state were asked if they would provide MAID if it was legal in their state; 36% of this group indicated they would provide the service, 30% would not, and 34% were uncertain.
  • Conclusions: MAID is a highly relevant topic for gynecologic oncologists and their patients. Support exists among gynecologic oncologists for legalizing and providing MAID more broadly.

Medscape Oncology Ethics Report 2020

  • When asked “should physician assisted dying be made legal for terminally ill patients?” 55 percent of the more than 5,000 oncologists surveyed nationwide said “yes,” compared to 49 percent in 2018.”

Medscape Poll, November 2020

  • When asked “should physician assisted dying be made legal for terminally ill patients?” 55 percent of the 5,000 doctors surveyed nationwide said “yes,” compared to 28 percent who said “no,” and 17% who said “it depends.”
  • The poll concluded: “Acceptance of this concept has grown over the decade. More specialists (57%) than primary care physicians (51%) are in favor of physician-assisted dying being legal.”
  • Medscape’s 2010 survey asking doctors if they supported medical aid in dying showed that 46 percent of physicians nationwide said yes, compared to 41 percent who said no, and 14% who said it depends.

Gallup Poll Social Survey, May 2020

  • Nearly three out of four adults who participated in a national survey (74%) agree that: “When a person has a disease that cannot be cured…doctors should be allowed by law to end the patient’s life by some painless means if the patient and his or her family request it.”
  • Majority support included every demographic group measured in the survey, including:
  • Men: 75%
  • Women: 73%
  • White People: 77%
  • People of Color: 65%
  • Age 18-34: 77%
  • Age 35-54: 79%
  • Age 55+: 68%
  • College Graduates: 79%
  • Some College Education: 70%
  • High School Graduates or Less Education: 71%
  • Republicans: 69%
  • Independents: 72%
  • Democrats: 85%
  • Conservatives: 57%
  • Moderates: 80%
  • Liberals: 87%

Gallup Poll Social Survey, May 2019

  • Nearly seven out of ten national adults surveyed (68%) agree that: “When a person has a disease that cannot be cured…doctors should be allowed by law to end the patient’s life by some painless means if the patient and his or her family request it.”

LifeWay Research online survey, Sept. 27-Oct. 1, 2016

  • Two thirds of Americans surveyed (67%) agree that: “When a person is facing a painful terminal disease, it is morally acceptable to ask for a physician’s aid in taking his or her own life.”
  • Majority support included Christians (59%), Catholics (70%), Protestants (53%), people who do not identify with any religion (84%) and those of other religions (70%) and attend religious services less than once a month (76 percent).
  • Majority support included Americans with some college education (71%) or with graduate degrees (73%) and with high school diplomas or less (61%), Americans aged 18 to 24 (77%). 35 to 44 (63%) and 55 to 64 (64%), White Americans (71%) and Hispanic  Americans (69%), In addition, more than half of Black, Non-Hispanic Americans (53%) agreed that: “Physicians should be allowed to assist terminally ill patients in ending their life.”

State Polling

Alaska Polling

Alaska Research Survey, 3rd Quarter of 2017

  • Seven out of 10 Alaskan voters surveyed (70%) agreed that: “…a person in Alaska who has been diagnosed with a terminal illness and has been given a prognosis by two physicians of less than six months to live, should have the legal right to end their life on their own terms, through the use of a doctor’s prescription.”

Arizona Polling

Behavior Research Center’s Rocky Mountain Poll, November 2015

  • By a 2-1 margin (56% vs. 31%), adult heads of households surveyed in Arizona support a “proposed law that would allow terminally ill persons to end their own lives provided that two doctors certify that the person is terminally ill and is mentally competent. The new law would also require that the ill person administer the lethal drug themselves orally or via injection. In this way the patient would be in total control of their end of life decision.”
  • Adults in the 55-and-over age bracket support the legislation by more than 2-to-1 (63% vs. 25%). Younger respondents favored the plan by smaller margins.

California Polling

California Health Care Foundation, Oct. 2019: Help Wanted: Californians’ Views and Experiences of Serious Illness and End-of-Life Care

  • Three in four Californians surveyed (75%) support the End of Life Option Act, the California state law that gives some terminally ill adults the option to take life-ending medication prescribed by a physician.
  • Support of this act varied by race/ethnicity (Asian 76%; Black 70%; Latino 68%; White 82%) and income (below 150% of the federal poverty line 65%; between 150% and 399% above the poverty line 71%; 400% above the federal poverty level 83%).

Colorado Polling

Colorado Presidential Election, November 8, 2016

  • By a 30-point margin (65% vs. 35%), Colorado voters approved the medical aid-in-dying ballot initiative, Prop. 106

Colorado Medical Society Member Survey, February 2016

  • Overall, 56% of CMS members are in favor of “physician-assisted suicide, where adults in Colorado could obtain and use prescriptions from their physicians for self-administered, lethal doses of medications”

Connecticut Polling

Greenberg Quinian Rosner (GQR), March 2021

  • Three out of four voters surveyed (75%) support: “legislation [that] will allow people with less than six months to live to request medication from their doctor that they could decide to take to end the dying process that patients find unbearable.”
  • The majority support for medical aid-in-dying legislation spans the age, demographic, gender identity, political, racial, and religious spectrum of the survey.
    • Democrats: 84%
    • Independents: 74%
    • Republicans: 64%
    • Men: 72%
    • Women: 78%
    • Age 18 – 49: 80%
    • Age 50+: 73%
    • White: 77%
    • Black: 71%
    • Hispanic: 80%
    • Mixed Race/Other: 64%
    • College Educated: 79%
    • Non-college Educated: 72%
    • College men: 77%
    • Non-college men: 69%
    • College women: 80%
    • Non-college women: 75%
    • People with disabilities: 65%
    • Protestant: 70%
    • Roman Catholic: 69%
    • Total Christian: 68%
    • No religious affiliation: 89%
    • Religious services weekly or more: 53%

Quinnipiac University Poll, March 2015

  • By more than a 2-1 margin (63% vs. 31%), Connecticut voters polled supported “allowing doctors to legally prescribe lethal drugs to help terminally ill patients end their own lives.”

Delaware Polling

GBAO Strategies Survey, Jan-Feb 2020

By more than a 3-1 margin (72% vs. 20 %), Delaware voters surveyed support legislation “that would give terminally ill patients with decision-making capacity the right to take medication to end their own lives.”

  • Majority support is consistent across the state: Wilmington (77%), New Castle County (77%), Kent County (71%), and Sussex County (69%).
  • Catholics (80%), Protestants (62%) and people in other religions (96%) support “allowing an adult with decision-making capacity, who is dying of a terminal disease with no hope of recovery, the right to bring about their own death.”
  • The survey showed majority support for medical aid-in-dying legislation by virtually every demographic group measured in the survey, including party affiliation, race, religion, gender, education level and age group.

Hawai‘i Polling

Merriman River Group poll, Nov. 27-29, 2017

  • By nearly a 3-1 margin (63% yes vs. 22% no), registered Hawaii voters who said: “If the state Legislature were to bring up a revised ‘medical aid in dying’ bill again next year [2018],” they would support it.
  • A plurality of voters — and in most cases a strong majority of voters — supported medical aid in dying in every demographic group: gender, age, ethnicity, county, district, education, political party affiliation, political leaning and household income.
  • “There used to be a stigma associated with it [medical aid in dying], but I think that’s largely gone,” said Matt Fitch, executive director of Merriman River Group, which conducted The Civil Beat Poll. “It’s supported across all four counties, both congressional districts, household income and education brackets.”

Journal of Palliative Medicine online survey, July-Oct. 2015: Multi-Ethnic Attitudes Toward Physician-Assisted Death in California and Hawaii

  • “Majority of study participants in California (72.5%) were supportive of PAD [physician-assisted death].”
  • “…all ethnic groups were equally supportive of PAD.”
  • “Even in the subgroups least supportive of PAD, the majority supports PAD.”
  • “In California, 75.6% of non-Hispanic whites, 74.3% of Asians, and 71.6% of Hispanics were in support of PAD compared to 59.6% of African Americans.”
  • “Within Asian Americans, Chinese were most favorably disposed toward PAD (82.7% in California), followed by Japanese (74.6% in California) and the Filipino Americans (67.7% in California).”
  • “It is remarkable that in both states, even participants who were deeply spiritual, a majority of 52%, were still in support of PAD.”
  • “The effects of gender and ethnicity did not reach statistical significance in terms of attitudes toward PAD.”

Maryland Polling

Goucher Poll, Feb. 7-12, 2019

  • More than six out of 10 Maryland adults polled (62%) said they support a recently proposed policy “that would allow terminally ill patients to obtain a prescription for a fatal dose of drugs from a willing doctor. To be eligible, these patients would have to be diagnosed as having less than six months to live, be mentally competent, and self-administer the drugs.”
  • Support included most voters in every demographic group: registered Independents voters (69%), registered Democratic voters (61%), registered Republican voters (55%), progressives (78%), moderates (63%), conservatives (47% support to 43% oppose), Whites (68%), Blacks (49% support vs. 40% oppose), other ethnic groups (62%), men (68%), women (56%), Montgomery Co./Prince Georges Co. (63%), Central Baltimore metro area (60%), outside urban corridor (63%), ages 18-34 (65%), ages 35-54, (64%), ages 55+ (56%), less than a four-year college degree (60%), four-year college degree or more (63%).

Public Policy Polling, February 6-7, 2019

  • Nearly two-thirds of Maryland voters (66%) think “Maryland should allow mentally capable adults, who are dying of a terminal illness with no hope of recovery, to have the legal option to request a medication to bring about their own death.”
  • Majority support spanned the entire demographic spectrum in the survey: Independents (73%), Democrats, (70%), Republicans (53%), Whites (69%), African-American (63%), Catholics (65%), Protestants (62%), Jews (67%), Muslims (52%), Ages 18 to 29 (67%), Ages 30-45 (63%), Ages 46-65 (67%), Ages 65 or older (67%).

Maryland State Medical Society (MedChi) survey, June-July 2016

  • Six out of 10 Maryland physicians (60%) supported changing the Maryland State Medical Society’s position on Maryland’s 2016 aid-in-dying legislation from opposing the bill to supporting it (47%) or adopting a neutral stance (13%).
  • Among the physicians surveyed who were current members of the Maryland State Medical Society, 65 percent supported changing the organization’s position to supporting the aid in dying bill (50.2%) or adopting a neutral stance (14.6%).

Massachusetts Polling

Boston Globe-Suffolk University, Nov. 2019

  • Seven out of 10 Massachusetts residents polled  (70%) agreed that “the terminally ill [should] be permitted to end their own lives with the help of a doctor, also known as medical aid in dying.”
  • This majority support spanned the demographic, ethnic and geographic spectrum in the survey: Male: 70%, Female: 69%, Worcester/Western Mass.: 70%, Suffolk: 75%, Southeast Mass./Cape: 68%, 18-­34: 75%, 35-­44: 65%, 45-­54: 73%, 55-­64: 75%, 65+: 68%, White: 73%, Black: 64%, Hispanic: 50%, Asian: 52%.

Massachusetts Medical Society survey, Sept. 5-Oct. 16, 2017

  • By a 2-1 margin, Massachusetts physicians (60%) said they strongly support (29%) or support (31%) “medical aid in dying…the practice of physicians giving terminally-ill adults prescriptions for lethal medications, to be self-administered at such time as the patient sees fit” vs. oppose or strongly oppose this end-of-life care option (30%).
  • By a more than 2-1 margin, physicians (62%) said they strongly support (27%) or support (35%) “proposed ’aid-in-dying legislation’ in Massachusetts, ‘an Act relative to end of life options’ (House bill 1194/Senate bill 1225)” vs. oppose or strongly oppose the legislation (28%).

Purple Insights Survey, February 2014

  • Seven out of 10 Massachusetts voters surveyed (70%) support a proposal to allow “mentally competent, terminally ill patients with less than six months to live [to] be able to end their life in a humane and dignified manner, using prescription medications they can self-administer.”
  • This majority support holds across all age groups (<50: 73%, 50-64: 73%, 65+: 67%), among Catholics (64%), Republicans (61%) and disabled voters (75%).

Minnesota Polling

Greenberg, Quinlan Rosner Research survey, Aug. 29 – Sept. 1, 2016

  • By a 51-point margin (73% vs. 22%) likely voters in Minnesota “support legislation that would authorize medical aid in dying” for mentally capable people age 18 or older with less than six months to live so they could request medication from their doctor that they could decide to take to shorten the dying process.
  • Legislation making the option available earns the support of 67 percent of Christians,  71 percent of Catholics, 93 percent of people who do not identify with any religion, 87 percent of Democrats, 76 percent of independents, 53 percent of Republicans; 61 percent of independents say they are more likely to vote for a candidate who supports medical aid-in-dying legislation.
  • Majority support for medical aid in dying exists in each region of the state. A legal option for medical aid in dying earns 74 percent support in the Minneapolis and St. Paul metropolitan area and 72 percent support in Greater Minnesota.

Minnesota State Senate Fair Poll, August–September 2016

  • By more than a 3-1 ratio (68% vs. 22%), Minnesotans who completed the state Senate’s questionnaire at the annual state fair agreed that: “When a mentally competent adult is dying from an incurable and irreversible medical condition that is expected to end the individual’s life within six months…this individual should be allowed to obtain from a physician a prescription for medication that may be  self-administered to end that person’s life.”

Minnesota House of Representatives State Fair Poll, August–September 2016

  • By nearly a 3-1 ratio, (67% vs. 23%), Minnesotans who completed the state House of Representatives’ questionnaire at the annual state fair agreed that: “When a mentally capable adult is dying from a terminal illness…this adult should be allowed to receive a prescription for life-ending medication they may self-administer.”

Montana Polling

Global Strategy Group Survey, April 2013

  • Seven out of 10 Montana voters polled (69%) support allowing a mentally competent adult who is dying of a terminal disease and in extreme pain to choose to end his or her life in a humane and dignified way.

Nevada Polling

Public Policy Polling, February 2021

  • Nearly three out of four Nevada voters (72%) support “legislation that would allow a terminally ill adult patient, with a prognosis of six-months or less to live and suffering from an incurable illness, to obtain a doctor’s prescription for a medication they may voluntarily take to end their life.”
  • Majority support included every demographic group measured, including: political affiliation, race, age, christian religion, and gender identity.
    • Democrats: 80%
    • Republicans: 65%
    • Libertarians: 82%
    • Independent or other party: 62%
    • African American Nevadans: 76%
    • Hispanic Nevadans: 73%
    • White Nevadans: 72%
    • Other races: 68%
    • Age 18-45: 73%
    • Age 46-65: 72%
    • Age 66 and older: 73%
    • Protestants: 71%
    • Catholics: 67%
    • Non-denominational Christians: 67%
    • Other religions: 74%
    • Women: 71%
    • Men: 74%

New Jersey Polling

Rutgers-Eagleton Poll, February 2015

  • By more than a 2-1 margin (63% to 29%), New Jersey residents support a state Legislature aid-in-dying bill that “would allow terminally ill patients to obtain a prescription to end their lives.”
  • “This is not really a partisan issue in New Jersey,” said Ashley Koning, manager of the Rutgers-Eagleton Poll. “Though a difficult subject for many, the issue has widespread support and acceptance here. Public opinion is mainly on the bill’s side.”
  • A majority of New Jerseyans of all denominations and levels of religiosity would prefer to relieve pain and discomfort, even if that meant shortening their life, including Protestants (73%), Catholics (64%) and other non-Protestant residents (59%).

New Mexico Polling

Research & Polling Survey, April 2012

  • Two out of three New Mexico voters (65%) favor “allowing a mentally competent adult, who is dying of a terminal disease, with no hope of recovery, the choice to request and receive medication from his/her physician which could bring about their own death, if there were appropriate safeguards in place to protect patients against abuse.”

New York Polling

Medscape WebMD survey, November, 2018

  • New York Doctors support medical aid in dying as an end-of-life care option by a 30-point margin (56% vs. 26%).
  • By an even larger 67-20 percent margin, New York doctors support proposed legislation to authorize medical aid in dying.

Quinnipiac University Poll, April 26-May 1, 2018

  • By more than a 2-1 margin (63% vs. 29%), New York State voters support “allowing doctors to legally prescribe lethal drugs to help terminally ill patients end their own lives.”
  • Majority support for medical aid in dying included virtually every demographic group the survey measured, including party affiliation, race, religion, sex, region, education level, and age group.
    •  Republicans (51%), Democrats (69%), Independents (67%)
    • Whites (69%), Non-whites (54%)
    • Catholics (55%), Protestants (54%), voters who attend religious services less than weekly (70%), voters with no religious affiliation (87%).
    • Men (69%), women (58%)
    • Upstate voters (63%), New York City voters (63%), suburban voters (64%),
    •  Voters with a college degree (73%), voters without a college degree (64%),
    • Voters aged 18-34 (69%), voters aged 35-49 (63%), voters aged 50-64 (68%), and voters aged 65+ (60%).

Tennessee Polling

Princeton Survey Research Associates International/Vanderbilt University, May 2015

  • Tennessee voters agreed by a 17-point margin (55% vs. 38%) that doctors should be permitted to assist people with painful, incurable diseases to painlessly end their lives.

Utah Polling

Dan Jones & Associates survey, November 2015

  • Nearly six of 10 adult Utahns (58%) favor “some kind of ‘right to die’ law, where licensed medical personnel could help a terminally-ill, mentally-competent person die with allowed drugs if that person chooses.”
  • Republicans are divided on the issue with 41% saying they favor “right-to-die” legislation and 50% opposed. Democrats and independents overwhelmingly prefer the idea with 90% of Democrats and 67% of independents supporting.
  • Of the Christian religious groups polled,there was not much of a religious divide on the question: 94% of those who say they don’t ascribe to any religion, self-described “not active” Latter Day Saints (LDS) Church members, 80% of Protestants, 79% of “somewhat active” Mormons, and 76% of Catholics favored the idea.
  • The only Christian religious group polled opposed to the idea were “very active” LDS Church members by a 54-38% margin.

Vermont Polling

Momentum Analysis Survey, June 2012

  • Seven out of ten Vermont voters polled (70%) favor legislation allowing “mentally competent, terminally ill patients with less than six months to live to be able to end their life in a humane and dignified manner, using prescription medications they can self-administer.”

Virginia Polling

Wason Center for Public Policy Survey, November 2020

  • Seven out of 10 Virginians (70%) agreed that: “Mentally capable adults with a terminal disease who have less than six months to live should have the right to request and receive medication to peacefully end their life in consultation with an attending and consulting physician.”
  • Majority support of at least 58 percent or more for medical aid in dying spanned the survey spectrum of political affiliation, race, religion, location, voters vs. non-voters, gender, education, income, and age:
    • Republican: 60%
    • Democrat: 81%
    • Independent: 73%
    • No preference: 59%
    • Latino: 58%
    • White: 69%
    • Black: 79%
    • Other: 58%
    • Protestant: 68%
    • Christian: 67%
    • Catholic: 60%
    • Jewish: 77%
    • Other: 76%
    • No religious affiliation: 82%
    • Northern Virginia: 64%
    • Richmond-central: 78%
    • Hampton Roads: 75%
    • Southside/SW/Valley: 65%
    • Larger city: 73%
    • Suburb near city: 76%
    • Smaller city or town: 66%
    • Rural: 62%
    • Voted: 70%
    • Did not Vote: 68%
    • Male: 69%
    • Female: 70%
    • H.S. education or less: 69%
    • College or more: 70%
    • Income under $25,000: 78%
    • $25,000-$49,999: 74%
    • $50,000-$74,999: 76%
    • $75,000-$99,999: 70%
    • $100,000-$149,999: 64%
    • $150,000+: 69%
    • Age 18-24: 68%
    • Age 25-34: 82%
    • Age 35-44: 74%
    • Age 45-54: 68%
    • Age 55+: 64%
    • Age 18-44: 76%
    • Age 45 & older: 65%

Washington, D.C., Polling

Lake Research Survey, July 2015

  • Two-thirds (67%) of District of Columbia residents support — and 51 percent strongly support — the right of terminally ill adults with less than six months to live to legally obtain medication to end their lives.